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Review: ONLY THE BROKEN REMAIN by Dan Coxon

Short stories are tough—for writers as well as readers. With only a little time to make an impact, many end up falling flat and forgettable. Thankfully for us readers, Dan Coxon knocks it out of the park with the short stories in Only The Broken Remain, his collection of dark and disturbing fiction featuring the downtrodden of the world.

Review: THE THIRTY NAMES OF NIGHT by Zeyn Joukhadar

Release Date November 24, 2020 Publisher Atria Books Content Warnings Transphobia, homophobia, racism, depictions of menstrual cycle, dysphoria, death of a parent Did I receive an ARC? No Links Goodreads | Indiebound | Bookshop | Kobo | Libro.fm Birds are falling in Manhattan. The community center is going to be torn down soon, and a…Continue reading »

Review: CHILDREN OF CHICAGO by Cynthia Pelayo

A series of teen deaths at Humboldt Park has the neighborhood on edge. New graffiti by someone calling themselves the Pied Piper keep popping up. And more kids might be in danger… Detective Lauren Medina throws herself into the case with her entire mind, body, and soul, all the while trying to keep her past in the past.

Review: I’M THINKING OF ENDING THINGS by Iain Reid

A couple months ago, my fiancé and I decided to adopt some kittens that my friend was fostering, and a few weeks ago they finally had their spay surgeries and I went to go pick them up from my friend’s house. The only problem was that my friend was a full four hours away, so I knew I’d need an audiobook for the trip. I haven’t been listening to audiobooks much lately, so I needed something shorter than eight hours so I’d have time to finish it, and I needed a book that worked as an audiobook. I’m Thinking of Ending Things hit every requirement.

Review: THE ARDENT SWARM by Yamen Manai

Part allegorical and part satirical, The Ardent Swarm follows various citizens of a fictional Arab country, where religious extremists and foreign hornets are taking over. Sidi is a beekeeper in Nawa, a small village where children who want to attend school must travel ten kilometers over the steppe and a young man gathers fallen fruit to trade for fish in the next village over. As world politics begin to encroach on the country’s natural resources, Sidi discovers that every bee in one of his hives has been viciously murdered.

Review: THE HATMAKERS by Tamzin Merchant

The Hatmakers have been waiting patiently for Prospero Hatmaker to return with the key ingredient for the Peace Hat they’re Making for the king, but as war looms over the country, Prospero is lost at sea. Cordelia knows that her father is still alive, and is determined to track him down even as her aunts and uncles scramble to finish the Peace Hat–but there are dark forces at work that would prefer the war to go ahead and are determined to stop the Hatmakers and Cordelia from success.

Review: RING SHOUT by P. Djèlí Clark

Ring Shout was my very last read of 2020, clocking in around 11 p.m. on New Year’s Eve, and what a fantastic way to end the year! Upon finishing this horror novella, I immediately went and bought all of P. Djèlí Clark’s backlist, that’s how much I loved it.

Review: A HOUSE AT THE BOTTOM OF A LAKE by Josh Malerman

Amelia and James have decided on the perfect first date: borrowing a canoe and paddling around interconnected lakes. As they explore, they find themselves in a hitherto unexplored lake, and find something that is really going to set this first date apart from all the other ones and which becomes the title of Josh Malerman’s novella, A House at the Bottom of a Lake.

Review: ANOKA by Shane Hawk

If you’re looking for new talent, look no further. Anoka by Shane Hawk is short, clocking in at only 84 pages and with only six short stories, but packs a big punch. Featuring the town of Anoka, Minnesota—purportedly the Halloween capital of the world—and exploring universal human themes through the lens of indigenous life, Anoka is a debut with astounding power.

Anthology Round-Up

After a month of end-of-year posts and last week’s bullshit, we’re back—however temporarily it may be—to our regularly scheduled programming. The world still appears to be on fire, but I read a lot of books in December and it’s about time to review them, so today I’ll be telling you about two literary magazines and…Continue reading »

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